History
While walking along the streets of Lima, you will feel the tasty smell of the anticuchos.
MEALS OF THE STREET
o Anticuchos
"Anticuchos" (Quechua for Cut Stew Meat) are popular, inexpensive dishes consisting of small pieces of grilled skewered meat. "Anticuchos" can be readily found on street carts and "anticucherias". The meat may be marinated in vinegar and spices (such as cumin, "aji" pepper and garlic), and while "anticuchos" can be made of any type of meat, the most popular type are made of cow heart ("anticuchos de Corazon"). "Anticuchos" often come with a boiled potato on the end of the skewer. "Anticuchos" can be traced as far back as the 16th century, when they were first encountered by the Spanish conquistadors. It was at this time that European ingredients such as garlic were added. It was a popular dish among the inhabitants of the Inca Empire.

"Anticuchos" are brochettes made from a beef heart marinated in a various Peruvian spices and grilled, often sided with boiled potatoes and corn. They are commonly sold by street vendors and served shish kabob-style, but you may find them in "criolla" food restaurants.

o Picarones
"Picarones" are made of Peruvian squash and sweet potatoes. It is served in a doughnut form and covered with syrup, made from "chancaca" (solidified molasses). It is traditional to serve "picarones" when people prepare "anticuchos". "Picarones" were created during the colonial period to replace "Buñuelos" since hey were too expensive to make. People started replacing traditional ingredients with squash and sweet potatoes. Accidentally, they created a new desert that rapidly increased in popularity throughout the country.

o Empanadas
Peruvian empanadas are usually baked. The most common variety contains ground beef seasoned with cumin, hard-boiled egg, onion, olives and raisins; the dough is usually sprinkled with icing sugar. Peruvians eat empanadas with limejuice. Also very popular are cheese or cheese and ham. Recently, "modern" empanadas, with a variety of filling have appeared such as chicken and mushrooms, shrimp or "aji de gallina" or "lomo saltado"

o Tamales
Peruvian "tamales" are filled with chicken or pork, boiled eggs, olives, peanuts or a piece of "aji" and usually wrapped in banana leaves. In other cities, other than Lima, tamales are smaller and wrapped in cornhusks. They differ from the tamales made in Lima because they use white corn instead of yellow corn. Another version is called "humita". It can be salted or sweet. Sweet ones have raisins, vanilla, oil, sugar. Salty ones can be filled with cheese ("queso fresco") or chicken. "Humitas" are cooked in the oven or in the "Pachamanca".
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